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Resume

A resume is a document that outlines your skills and experiences so an employer can see, at a glance, how you can contribute to the employer's company. So your resume has to sell you in short order.

A resume is a document presented by a job applicant to a prospective employer outlining and summarizing that person's qualifications for employment. A resume generally includes data on education, previous work experience, and personal information, and well-crafted ones are composed in such a way as to maximize the applicant's attractiveness as a potential employee.

A resume is generally accompanied by a cover letter which introduces the applicant and the resume to the employer. The purpose of a resume is to obtain an interview, not to land a job. This is an important distinction. Whether or not a person is hired is largely determined by what transpires during the job interview, not by the resume. A resume is extremely important, however, because it provides the employer with a first impression of the job applicant. From this first impression a decision will be made as to whether or not an interview will be granted.

While you may have all the requirements for a particular position, your resume is a failure if the employer does not instantly come to the conclusion that you "have what it takes."The first hurdle your resume has to pass - whether it ends up in the "consider file" or the "reject file" - may take less than thirty seconds. The more you know about the duties and skills required for the job - and organize your resume around these points - the more effective the resume.

Resume types:

  • Chronological resume - The chronological resume is organized by job titles with the most recent position listed first.
  • Curriculum Vitae - A detailed, lengthy and structured listing of education, publications, projects, awards and work history. A curriculum vitae for a mid-career candidate may be as long as twenty pages.
  • Functional resume - The functional resume rearranges employment history into sections that highlight areas of skill and accomplishment.